Discover the Best!

Alltopics lets you discover the most popular news, images, videos and gifs from around the web, on all your favorite topics.

Our content-analysis-technology and veteran editors surface the latest trending content so you never miss out on your next favorite thing.

Sign up now to follow your favorite topics and discover the best of the Internet!

Sign Up  Get the App

Russia

Russian President Vladimir Putin told President Trump that Russian hackers wouldn't have gotten caught if they did hack Democratic groups because they're too skilled at spying.

The U.S. intelligence community concluded last year that Russia hacked the DNC and Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton's campaign chairman as part of an effort to help Trump win the presidential election.

The Justice Department, FBI and House and Senate Intelligence committees are investigating Russian interference as well as links between Trump's team and the Kremlin, which Trump has denied.

Trump met with Putin multiple times at the Group of 20 summit in Germany earlier this month, with each of the meetings lasting more than an hour. thehill.com
The White House has indicated that President Donald Trump would sign a sweeping Russia sanctions measure that requires him to get Congress’ permission before lifting or easing the economic penalties against Moscow.

The House was scheduled to consider the sanctions package as early as Tuesday, and the bill could be sent to Trump before Congress breaks for the August recess.

The legislation is aimed at punishing Moscow for meddling in the presidential election and its military aggression in Ukraine and Syria.

Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the newly appointed White House press secretary, said Sunday that the administration is supportive of being tough on Russia and “particularly putting these sanctions in place.”

“We support where the legislation is now, and will continue to work with the House and Senate to put those tough sanctions in place on Russia until the situation in Ukraine is fully resolved,” Sanders said on ABC’s “This Week.” washingtonpost.com
Donald Trump’s oldest son Donald Jr and son-in-law Jared Kushner met with a lawyer connected to the Kremlin during the 2016 election campaign after being promised damaging information on Hillary Clinton, a new report from the New York Times says.

Three White House advisers briefed on the meeting confirmed the news that those members of the Trump campaign were keen on hearing about compromising information on Ms Clinton from the Russian-connected sources.

Mr Trump Jr and Mr Kushner were accompanied by Paul Manafort, who was the campaign manager for Mr Trump at the time.

This is the first time that reports have indicated that members of the Trump campaign’s inner circle met with Russian officials during the campaign, though it is unclear if the meeting actually yielded the promised damaging information. independent.co.uk
Fidget spinners are the latest playground phenomenon, but children interested in this deluxe version will need to save up a hell of a lot of lunch money to afford it.

The fidget spinner, reportedly the world’s most expensive, has just gone on sale and it will set you back a whopping £13,000.

Russian luxury jewellery specialists Caviar have designed four high-quality versions of the popular spinning toy.

Their most expensive type of fidget spinner is coated in 100 grams of gold and it can be pre-ordered for almost one million rubles (£13,000). telegraph.co.uk
Russian scientists working on the Mayak satellite – which is set to be the brightest ‘star’ in the night sky – have announced that it is nearing completion.

Its designers say it could be used to combat space junk by using a parachute-like structure to lower the orbits of debris so they can burn up in Earth’s atmosphere.

However, some astronomers have slammed the creation, which is no larger than a rugby ball, calling it a ‘nonsense’ project that could ‘ruin’ dark skies for everyone.

The controversial satellite is due to be launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Friday 14 July.

The launch of Mayak is expected to be taken up in a Soyuz 2 rocket, with help from Roscosmos, the Russian space agency. briefnews.com
It might resemble something out of Star Wars, but this is the prototype for a combat suit that Russia hopes will give its soldiers the edge on the battlefields of the future.

The high-tech item includes an exo-skeleton, or outer layer, designed to boost strength and stamina and a layer of body armour to shield the wearer from bullets.

The all-black kit also has a Stormtrooper-style helmet with a tinted glass visor and a mini task light poking out of the side.

It was put on display on Thursday at the National University of Science and Technology in Moscow.

The suit was created at the Central Research Institute for Precision Machine Building, a Moscow-based weapons development centre.

Russia also has plans to replace human soldiers with robots to fight on land, air, sea and even outer space. briefnews.com
Maksym Shapoval, a colonel in the chief intelligence directorate of Ukraine’s Ministry of Defense, was blown up in a car-bomb explosion at 8:14 a.m. on June 27 in Kyiv.

Ukraine’s law enforcement agencies put the blame on Russia, chief military prosecutor Anatoly Matios said during a press briefing at the Presidential Administration building in Kyiv.

An explosion in a car killed Shapoval on Solomyanska Street in Kyiv.

It also injured a female passerby. kyivpost.com
The Democratic Front, an alliance of parties opposed to Montenegro’s membership of Nato, flies a giant Russian flag from the top balcony of its red-and-white headquarters in Podgorica.

Stripped of parliamentary immunity while allegedly attempting to overthrow the government in a Russian-backed plot, the Balkan leaders proudly join the alliance as its 29th member.

While many analysts expect Russia to continue fomenting unrest, the political crisis tied to the coup investigation is likely to pose a greater threat, Serbian Prime Minister Aleksandar Vučić says.

"The lack of a real pro-European alternative is maybe a bigger problem.”  theguardian.com