Discover the Best!

Alltopics lets you discover the most popular news, images, videos and gifs from around the web, on all your favorite topics.

Our content-analysis-technology and veteran editors surface the latest trending content so you never miss out on your next favorite thing.

Sign up now to follow your favorite topics and discover the best of the Internet!

Sign Up  Get the App

War

South Korea has fired into North Korea after an "unidentified object" was sent towards the country.

South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff said in a statement that the South Korean military bolstered its air surveillance and broadcast a warning to North Korea in response to the object.

It provided no other details.

The mystery flying object may have been a drone, local media speculated.

South Korea's Yonhap news agency, without citing a source, reported that South Korea fired about 90 machine gun rounds into the air and toward North Korea.

It said South Korea was analyzing whether a North Korean drone had crossed the border. telegraph.co.uk
The Battle of Britain cost the lives of my pilots in a struggle that would result in the first major victory against Nazi Germany. 

The Royal Air Force had great planes but they needed better ones to stop the German onslaught.

“The pugnacious Beaufighter derived closely from the Beaufort design, and more distantly from Blenheim antecedents. Equally, at home on land or sea, the Beaufighter was highly successful as a heavy strike fighter, as a night fighter, in reconnaissance or in the torpedo attack role.”

The fact that these planes were equipped with radar allowed for better detection of enemy aircraft during the blitz, allowing it to succeed as an interceptor.

But not all was well for the Beaufighter, it was afflicted by a major issue that affected its success in combat.

Its weight was on the problematic side, slowing it down to a near vulnerability when it was in combat and pilots also complained of dangerous landings to the weight. worldwarwings.com
AN SAS sniper killed an ISIS terrorist from almost 2.4km away using a mega-powerful rifle, a report says.

It took three whole seconds for the bullet to reach the terror thug in Mosul, Iraq two weeks ago.

A veteran sniper hit the insurgent in the throat as he tried to escape a burnt-out building, killing him almost instantly.

It is believed to be one of the most difficult long-range kills in the elite regiment’s history.

The paper claimed the shot was fired from a CheyTac M200, a record-breaking US-made rifle with a max range of up to nearly 3.2km.

It was reportedly on loan to the British army as part of a battlefield trial. news.com.au
Frank Cortese is one of the few people who fought on both sides during World War II.

He started as a sailor with the Italian navy, fighting against the Allies.

After Italy surrendered, he continued as an Italian sailor fighting for the Allies. As most familiar with history remember, Italy entered the war on the side of Germany and Japan, before surrendering in October 1943.

Cortese enlisted in his country's navy when he was 16 years old. 

The move was not necessarily out of a sense of patriotism. His mother, Maria, suggested it as a job opportunity, given that Italy's economy was a wreck at the time. buffalonews.com
France will step up the fight against resurgent Islamist militants in north and west Africa and will work more closely with Germany to help the tinderbox region, President Emmanuel Macron said on his first trip outside Europe on Friday.

Visiting Mali days after taking office, Macron vowed to keep French troops in the Sahel region until there was "no more Islamist terrorism" there.

He said operations would be escalated in response to signs that militant groups were regrouping and uniting.

"It is vital today that we speed up, our armed forces are giving their all, but we must speed up" efforts to secure the Sahel, he told a news conference in Gao, Mali, where he held talks with President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita and spoke to some of the 1,600 French soldiers based there. reuters.com
Between September 1944 and May 1945, the First Canadian Army fought by land, sea and air to push the Nazis out of the Netherlands.

Canadian soldiers faced the daunting task of an overland assault across difficult, flooded terrain against an entrenched enemy.

More than 7,600 Canadian soldiers died on Dutch soil.

To this day, the gratitude and relationship between Canada and the Netherlands continues.

For Canda's 150th birthday, the Dutch engineered a flower that has a blend of red and white petals representing the Canadian flag as a thank you.

They will be featured at this year’s Tulip Festival in Ottawa. globalnews.ca
NATO pushed back on a report claiming the group’s secretary general said President Trump “has a 12-second attention span.” 

“The president of the United States has a 12-second attention span,” Stoltenberg reportedly said, adding that the president appeared unprepared for his meeting with the Norwegian Stoltenberg. 

However, a NATO spokesman denied Stoltenberg said this, saying "the secretary general never said this and it does not represent his views.” thehill.com
A derogatory term to denounce soldiers with mental illness is still being used in the Australian Army, former soldiers have said.

The word "malinger", which means to pretend injury to get out of work, is used by soldiers to denigrate comrades struggling with depression.

"If people were depressed they certainly didn't talk about it," said one former soldier of the Royal Australian Regiment's 5th battalion (5RAR), who wants to remain anonymous.

"A lot of people choose not to [talk] because it can bring on derogatory terms like 'linger' which is short for malingerer, which basically means you're trying to get out of doing your work." abc.net.au