Discover the Best!

Topday lets you discover the most popular news, images, videos and gifs from around the web, on all your favorite topics.

Our content-analysis-technology and veteran editors surface the latest trending content so you never miss out on your next favorite thing.

Sign up now to follow your favorite topics and discover the best of the Internet!

Sign Up  Get the App

Tech

The $299 Nest Cam IQ’s big pitch is intelligence.

It combines high resolution with smart people tracking to automatically zoom in on a subject when it sees a person in the frame and still maintain good image quality.

It can “see” friendly faces that you identify in the Nest app and it can alert you when it sees a person that it doesn’t recognize.

To make this work, you need to subscribe to the Nest Aware service, which is available with 10 days of rolling back ups for $10 per month or $100 per year, or 30 days of rolling back ups for $30 per month or $300 per year.

Without the subscription service, the Cam IQ will still provide push alerts to your phone for motion, sound, and people, but its Familiar Faces feature will not work and it will only be able to rewind the last three hours of footage.

There are also three microphones and a speaker on the Cam IQ, so if you have it set up in the right place, you can talk to a person through it. theverge.com
The notion of an artificial leaf makes so much sense because leaves, of course, harness energy from the sun to turn carbon dioxide into the carbohydrates that power a plant’s cellular activities.

For decades, scientists have been working to devise a process similar to photosynthesis to generate a fuel that could be stored for later.

This could solve a major challenge of solar and wind power—providing a way to stow the energy when the sun is not shining and the air is still.

A step closer to actual photosynthesis would be to employ the hydrogen in a reduction reaction that converts CO2 into hydrocarbon, and, like a real leaf, this system would use only CO2, water and sunlight to produce fuels.

In a June 2016 issue of Science, Daniel G. Nocera and Pamela A. Silver, both at Harvard University, and their colleagues reported on an approach to making liquid fuel (specifically fusel alcohols) that far exceeds a natural leaf’s conversion of carbon dioxide to carbohydrates.

The achievement could be revolutionary, enabling creation of a closed system in which carbon dioxide emitted by combustion was transformed back into fuel instead of adding to the greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. scientificamerican.com
A massive ransomware attack is causing havoc at airports, banks and many other institutions across Europe.

It remains unclear who is behind the ttack, but Moscow-based security firm Group-IB told Reuters it appears to be a coordinated effort simultaneously targeting victims in Russia and Ukraine.

While the attack seems to be more widely spread in Russia and Ukraine, it is also affecting companies in Denmark, Spain and the US.

So far several companies have reported experiencing issues, including Copenhagen-based shipping giant A.P. Moller-Maersk and Russia’s top oil producer Rosneft. thenextweb.com
Google has been fined 2.42bn euros ($2.7bn; £2.1bn) by the European Commission after it ruled the company had abused its power by promoting its own shopping comparison service at the top of search results.

The ruling also orders Google to end its anti-competitive practices within 90 days or face a further penalty.

The US firm said it may appeal, but,  if it fails to change the way it operates the Shopping service within the three-month deadline, it could be forced to make payments of 5% of its parent company Alphabet's average daily worldwide earnings.

Based on the company's most recent financial report, that amounts to about $14m a day.

There's mounting anxiety in European capitals about something called Gafa - Google, Apple, Facebook and Amazon - the four American giants that play such a huge role in all of our lives.

That means we can expect further action to try to limit their powers, with the potential for growing political tension between Brussels and Washington. bbc.com
A massive ransomware attack is causing havoc at airports, banks and many other institutions across Europe.

It remains unclear who is behind the ttack, but Moscow-based security firm Group-IB told Reuters it appears to be a coordinated effort simultaneously targeting victims in Russia and Ukraine.

While the attack seems to be more widely spread in Russia and Ukraine, it is also affecting companies in Denmark, Spain and the US.

So far several companies have reported experiencing issues, including Copenhagen-based shipping giant A.P. Moller-Maersk and Russia’s top oil producer Rosneft. thenextweb.com