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Environment

It would be hard to find cheaper food in Oslo than that sold at Best Før.

They flog the stuff that no one else has been able to get rid off, products whose season has passed, or which have been overproduced, have been arriving at this small store since October last year when the mainstream Lentusgruppen supermarket chain heeded the call of the Norwegian government and decided to take food waste seriously.

They established an offshoot in Oslo, the first of its kind in the city, selling the stuff other stores and suppliers throw away.

It’s all up front – the shop looks like any other, but a large sign informs customers of the slightly different nature of the food down their aisles and in the chillers, which includes chicken fillets frozen a couple of days before going off.

“Most supermarkets won’t buy products that are within 10 days or so of their expiry date – it often has to be wasted,” Ahmed explains adding: “We thought, why don’t we make a place that has that kind of product, that will be beneficial to every party: the consumer, the supplier, and us, a win-win for everybody.”

Best Før is the latest concept that has taken root in Norway, where collaboration between industry and the government to tackle food waste has sparked a range of innovations designed to make the most of what the country produces. theguardian.com
The next episode of Game of Thrones has leaked online and this time it's not hackers, but HBO themselves that might be to blame.

In an unbelievable blunder HBO Spain has appeared to accidentally broadcast episode 6 of series 7 four days early.

The episode was reportedly available on-demand to Spanish subscribers for one hour before the error was spotted and the episode pulled down.

But that was long enough for the show to be ripped and shared.

It's not the first time an episode from season 7 has leaked, earlier this month, episode 4 of the fantasy drama, 'The Spoils Of War', was widely shared through a Google Drive link despite continued attempt to stop hackers. mirror.co.uk
In a win for conservationists and environmental groups, British Columbia says it will no longer allow the trophy hunting of grizzly bears in the Canadian province starting on Nov. 30.

The new policy blocks all hunting of grizzlies in the Great Bear Rainforest but still allows people to hunt them for food elsewhere in British Columbia.

Of the approximately 15,000 grizzlies in British Columbia, about 250 are killed by hunters annually, according to government figures.

Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development Minister Doug Donaldson characterized that level of hunting as "sustainable" in an interview with the CBC.

However, he says the decision to end trophy hunting is "not a matter of numbers, it's a matter of society has come to the point in B.C. where they are no longer in favour of the grizzly bear trophy hunt." npr.org
This is going to sound weird, but there’s a wildfire right now in west Greenland, you know, that huge island of mostly ice?

Part of it is on fire, and there’s been nothing even close to this since reliable satellite-based fire detection records began in Greenland in 2000. 

Very small wildfires can evade satellite detection, and old-timer scientists who have worked in Greenland for decades say that micro-fires there aren’t necessarily uncommon, but this week’s fire, however, is on another level.

What’s striking about the Greenland fire is that it fits a larger trend of rapid change across the northern reaches of the planet, and a 2013 study found that across the entire Arctic, forests are burning at a rate unseen in at least 10,000 years.

“Everything we know suggests that fire will increase in the Arctic,” climate scientist Jason Box, whose work focuses on Greenland, said, adding: “It’s fair to say that it’s part of the pattern of warming, so we should see more such fires in Greenland.”

Should wildfires like this one increase in frequency, we may have just witnessed the start of a new, scary feedback loop. motherjones.com
Millions of Chinese cyclists may soon be able to ditch their air-pollution masks.

Dutch innovation firm Studio Roosegaarde has partnered with bike-share startup ofo to develop a new model that can collect polluted air, purify it, and release the clean air around the cyclist.

Studio founder Daan Roosegaarde confirms to Quartz that the first prototype of the smog-sucking “future bike” is expected to be ready by the end of this year.

Unveiled at the TED conference in April, the “Smog Free Bicycles” are part of Roosegaarde’s suite of objects to address the global air pollution crisis.

Last year, he unveiled a Smog Free Tower in China that could purify 30,000 cubic meters (about 1 million cubic feet) of air every hour.

With Beijing-based ofo’s fleet of 6.5 million bikes in more than 150 cities and 3 million daily users, Roosegaarde hopes his air-purifying bikes can have a lasting impact on ameliorating deadly air pollution around the world. qz.com
The world will almost certainly reach a tipping point and bring about unstoppable, destructive climate change, according to a new study.

There is a 90 per cent chance that the world's temperature will rise 2C, to 4.9C above pre-industrial levels by the end of the century, despite measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

It's at that point that scientists think the world will fall into disastrous effects like widespread drought, extreme weather and dangerous increases in sea level.

Experts have suggested that 2C of warming is the "tipping point" at which that change becomes unstoppable.

The world will almost certainly fail to keep warming to the 1.5C target that was set as part of the Paris climate agreement, according to the same research, and there's a 99 per cent chance that climate change will break through that limit.

The approach is different from that taken by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), whose most recent report included future warming rates based on four carbon emission scenarios. independent.co.uk
More than 150,000 people could die as a result of climate change each year in Europe by the end of the century, shocking new research has found.

The number of deaths caused by extreme weather events will increase 50-fold and two in three people on the continent will be affected by disasters, the study – that serves as a stark warning of the deadly impact of global warming – found.

The research by European Commission scientists lays out a future where hundreds of thousands of people die from heatstroke, heart and breathing problems, and flash flooding.

It describes a world where droughts bring food shortages, people are at an increased risk of being killed by disease and infection, and the countryside is ravaged by wildfires.

Yearly deaths could soar 50 times from 3,000 between 1981 and 2010 to 152,000 between 2071 and 2100, and most of those people will die from heatwaves, which could cause 99 per cent of all weather-related deaths with fatalities surging from 2,700 per year now to 151,500 each year by 2071.

In what they say is a “much needed wake-up call” to governments across the continent, campaign groups insisted that action is needed now to avoid being responsible for deaths across the world. independent.co.uk
Extreme heatwaves that kill even healthy people within hours will strike parts of the Indian subcontinent unless global carbon emissions are cut sharply and soon, according to new research.

Even outside of these hotspots, three-quarters of the 1.7bn population – particularly those farming in the Ganges and Indus valleys – will be exposed to a level of humid heat classed as posing “extreme danger” towards the end of the century.

The new analysis assesses the impact of climate change on the deadly combination of heat and humidity, measured as the “wet bulb” temperature (WBT), and once this reaches 35C, the human body cannot cool itself by sweating and even fit people sitting in the shade will die within six hours.

The revelations show the most severe impacts of global warming may strike those nations, such as India, whose carbon emissions are still rising as they lift millions of people out of poverty.

Heatwaves are already a major risk in South Asia, with a severe episode in 2015 leading to 3,500 deaths, and India recorded its hottest ever dayin 2016 when the temperature in the city of Phalodi, Rajasthan, hit 51C.

Prof Chris Huntingford, at the UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, said: “If given just one word to describe climate change, then ‘unfairness’ would be a good candidate, because raised levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere are expected to cause deadly heatwaves for much of South Asia, yet many of those living there will have contributed little to climate change.” theguardian.com
Earth Overshoot Day will arrive on August 2 this year, according to environmental groups WWF and Global Footprint Network. This is a day earlier than in 2016.

It means humanity will be living on "credit" for the rest of the year.

"By August 2, 2017, we will have used more from Nature than our planet can renew in the whole year," the groups said in a statement.

"This means that in seven months, we emitted more carbon than the oceans and forests can absorb in a year, we caught more fish, felled more trees, harvested more, and consumed more water than the Earth was able to produce in the same period."

The equivalent of 1.7 planets would be required to produce enough to meet humanity's needs at current consumption rates.

Calculated since 1986, the grim milestone has arrived earlier each year. phys.org