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Google’s Pixel already boasts a formidable camera, among the best in smartphone photography. A Google Daydream engineer Florian Kainz revealed how much more incredible it could be specifically in the area of night photography, when he set himself the task of reproducing DLSR-style nighttime picture quality using both a Pixel and a Nexus 6P.

The experiment, detailed on the Google Research blog, involved pushing the Android smartphone cameras to their limits, making use of their maximum exposure time, 64-frame burst shooting, mixing exposed shots of the target scene with pure black frames shot with the camera’s lens taped up completely, and a whole lot of desktop post-processing work.

The relatively easy part, at least in terms of repeat use, was coding a simple manual photography app for Android that let him set the exposure length, focal distance and ISO required to get the raw images he needed to process using desktop imaging software. The most difficult part might’ve been adjusting the alignment of the various stacked captures to compensate for stellar motion, which is the motion of stars across the night sky, and why you see star trails in unedited long exposure nighttime photography. techcrunch.com
Experts say you should cover your webcam, and the ISCC offers the best cover design we've seen.

One of the most unsettling revelations to come from Edward Snowden’s leak of classified documents is the National Security Agency’s (NSA) ability to hack into our webcams. The NSA is so sophisticated, it has specific tools to take over devices, hijack microphones, snap clandestine photos, and even record videos, according to The Intercept.

In April, FBI Director James Comey admitted he covers his webcam with a piece of tape. A couple months later, internet sleuths noticed Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg did so, too. By September, Comey told a conference room we should all cover up our webcams.

But there are better solutions than stickers and tape for the design conscious among us, and a new Kickstarter campaign seems to offer one of the best solutions yet.

The Intelligent Security Camera Cover (ISCC) claims to be the “the world’s thinnest, most ergonomic, and seamless mechanical webcam privacy cover.” After browsing the many mechanical camera covers available online, we’re inclined to agree. digitaltrends.com
Advertisers have found ways to bombard us with promotions no matter what we’re doing: watching TV, checking social media, and even when streaming music. But the future of advertising could be even more invasive when the next public event you attend is full of flying video drones projecting inescapable video everywhere you look.

NTT Docomo, one of Japan’s largest wireless carriers, created this unique flying sphere that’s surrounded by eight curved LED strips that can spin at high speed while it’s flying. (As light and thin as LCD displays have become, they’re still relatively heavy for a battery-powered drone to hoist into the air.)

This approach can create what is essentially a flying video screen with minimal weight to improve battery life and flight times. The design also allows the drone’s propellers to be hidden inside, so as not to obstruct images or videos being displayed.

The image resolution on this 35-inch-wide prototype is limited to just 144 x 136 pixels—lower resolution than even the Apple Watch’s tiny screen. So if you were hoping one of these drones could follow you around letting you binge on Netflix all day, you won’t have the best experience. But as the technology improves, eventually this flying video drone could reach HD resolutions, and maybe even 4K. gizmodo.com
Police in Connecticut have cited Fitbit records in an arrest warrant for a 40-year-old man charged with killing his wife in 2015.

Richard Dabate (DAH-bayt) faces murder, tampering with evidence and making a false statement charges in the fatal shooting of 39-year-old Connie Dabate on Dec. 23, 2015.

Authorities say the 40-year-old Dabate told them a masked man had entered their home, shot his wife and tied him up before he burned the intruder with a torch. But the New York Daily News reports Connecticut State Police wrote in an arrest warrant that Connie Dabate's Fitbit was logging steps after the time Richard Dabate told them she was killed.

Dabate's bail was set at $1 million last week. His lawyer told the Hartford Courant that his client maintains his innocence. apnews.com
It was around sunset on Easter Sunday, April 16, when Brad Jones took his DJI Inspire 2 out for a flight in front of his home. Jones hoped, as he does on most nights, to capture some of the forested and hilly scenery in the environs of his hometown, Oliver Springs, Tennessee—about 30 miles west of Knoxville.

He flew back westward. He had just switched the drone’s camera mode from video to taking still photos in RAW format.

“I took two pictures, then I heard the gunshot, and all of a sudden my drone started spiraling down—I’m sitting there trying to keep it aloft and there was no lift.”

A nearby neighbor, who was also in the front of his own home, turned to Jones and exclaimed: “That hit it! You just got shot! It’s going to crash!”

Indeed, Jones watched as his beloved drone came plummeting straight down onto the property of the Coalfield Seventh Day Adventist Church—right next to a neighbor’s home, where young children were playing in the backyard.

“It didn’t hit the ground as hard as it could have,” Jones said. “When it hit, it broke the left landing gear arm, snapped the molding off the Inspire. But it was still running. Didn’t damage batteries, rotors were intact. Everything was fine, except the left rear motor with a bullet hole in it.”

Jones became the fourth reported drone shooting incident that Ars has been made aware of in nearly two years. arstechnica.com