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Researchers in China grafted the heads of smaller rats onto the necks of larger rats.

The scientists successfully avoided any brain-damaging blood loss, accomplishing the goal of the study published in 'CNS Neuroscience and Therapeutics.'

Blood vessels of the donor rat's head were attached to a third rat's blood vessels which kept blood flowing continuously to the donor rat's brain.

No damaging was detected on EEGs monitoring the donor rat's brain activity throughout the transplanting procedure. vice.com
Universal basic income — a system of wealth distribution that involves giving people a monthly wage just for being alive — just got a standing ovation at this year's TED conference.

Rutger Bregman, a Dutch historian and basic income advocate, gave a talk on the subject in which he explored a crucial question: Why do the poor make such poor decisions?

Poverty isn't a character flaw, Bregman explained. People in poverty tend to eat less healthfully, save less money, and do drugs more often because they don't have their basic needs met.

Bregman suggested that creating a system of basic income would be the quickest and easiest way to meet those needs.

"Poverty is not a lack of character. Poverty is a lack of cash," he said, before the TED crowd of 1,000-plus rose to its feet.

Bregman's standing ovation reflects the particular appeal that basic income is gaining among America's technologists. businessinsider.com
Advertisers have found ways to bombard us with promotions no matter what we’re doing: watching TV, checking social media, and even when streaming music. But the future of advertising could be even more invasive when the next public event you attend is full of flying video drones projecting inescapable video everywhere you look.

NTT Docomo, one of Japan’s largest wireless carriers, created this unique flying sphere that’s surrounded by eight curved LED strips that can spin at high speed while it’s flying. (As light and thin as LCD displays have become, they’re still relatively heavy for a battery-powered drone to hoist into the air.)

This approach can create what is essentially a flying video screen with minimal weight to improve battery life and flight times. The design also allows the drone’s propellers to be hidden inside, so as not to obstruct images or videos being displayed.

The image resolution on this 35-inch-wide prototype is limited to just 144 x 136 pixels—lower resolution than even the Apple Watch’s tiny screen. So if you were hoping one of these drones could follow you around letting you binge on Netflix all day, you won’t have the best experience. But as the technology improves, eventually this flying video drone could reach HD resolutions, and maybe even 4K. gizmodo.com
The eastern Chinese city of Nanjing, like many of the country's urban areas, suffers from intense smog. 

The Air Quality Index, which uses a scale from 0 to 500 (with higher numbers indicating worse pollution), rates Nanjing's air quality as 132 – a level considered unhealthy for the public, especially those with respiratory disease.

The Italian design firm Stefano Boeri Architetti believes that building towers covered in plants could help the city reduce its pollution.

The company recently announced that it will build two skyscrapers that will hold a total of 1,100 trees and 2,500 cascading shrubs on their rooftops and balconies.

Construction on the buildings, called the Nanjing Green Towers, began in early 2017 and is set to wrap up next year.

The design will be similar to that of a two-tower complex that Boeri designed in Milan. Another tower in Lausanne, Switzerland will follow a similar plan and is expected to open by early 2018. sciencealert.com
The biggest hunger relief organization in the U.S. is using technology to help restaurants, grocery stores, and other businesses fight food waste. 

In honor of Earth Day on Saturday, Feeding America launched a new tech platform called MealConnect. As its name implies, the free service taps into the organization's large network, connecting businesses that have surplus food with thousands of food banks and other meal programs.

The goal is to advance the organization's mission of solving hunger in the country by 2025 by tackling the persistent yet often overlooked problem of food waste caused by businesses and food chains.

MealConnect lets stores and other donors — whether it's a Starbucks, local butcher, grocery store, or farmers market — to post when they have food that would otherwise go to waste. Then, the platform's algorithms figure out the best local food pantry or program to pick up the extra food and distribute it quickly to those in need.  mashable.com
The unpredictable annual flow of the Nile River is legendary, as evidenced by the story of Joseph and the Pharaoh, whose dream foretold seven years of abundance followed by seven years of famine in a land whose agriculture was, and still is, utterly dependent on that flow. Now, researchers at MIT have found that climate change may drastically increase the variability in Nile’s annual output.

Being able to predict the amount of flow variability, and even to forecast likely years of reduced flow, will become ever more important as the population of the Nile River basin, primarily in Egypt, Sudan, and Ethiopia, is expected to double by 2050, reaching nearly 1 billion. The new study, based on a variety of global climate models and records of rainfall and flow rates over the last half-century, projects an increase of 50 percent in the amount of flow variation from year to year.

The study, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, was carried out by professor of civil and environmental engineering Elfatih Eltahir and postdoc Mohamed Siam. They found that as a result of a warming climate, there will be an increase in the intensity and duration of the Pacific Ocean phenomenon known as the El Niño/La Niña cycle, which they had previously shown is strongly connected to annual rainfall variations in the Ethiopian highlands and adjacent eastern Nile basins. These regions are the primary sources of the Nile’s waters, accounting for some 80 percent of the river’s total flow. mit.edu
A 300-pound egg-shaped security robot was punched to the ground by an allegedly drunken man outside a Silicon Valley shopping center, Mountain View police said.

A 41-year-old Mountain View man has been arrested in connection to the alleged parking-lot altercation with the Knightscope-made droid. The accused robo-assailant, who faces charges of prowling and public intoxication, was identified as Jason Sylvain. The robot suffered minor scratches and is back on duty following last week's incident, which was first reported Tuesday by ABC7 News.

Sylvain was not immediately reachable for comment.

Last year, one of the Knightscope's security robots knocked over a 16-month-old child at a Silicon Valley shopping center. The robot ran over the boy's right foot, causing bruising but not breaking it. arstechnica.com