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Donald Trump's team is readying an executive order to take the US out of the North American Free Trade Agreement (Nafta), it has been reported.

Withdrawing from the trade agreement between Canada, Mexico, and the US was one of Mr Trump's key promises on the campaign trail in 2016. He claimed it is a "job killer" and was antithetical to his "America First" approach to governing. 

The order has been submitted for final review to the appropriate teams within the White House and may be signed as early as the next few days. 

The deal, one of the largest trade agreement in the world, was originally signed in 1994 by President Bill Clinton and allows free trade between the three countries in North America. 

Mr Trump speaking in Wisconsin recently said that the agreement has been “very, very bad for our companies and for our workers, and we’re going to make some very big changes or we are going to get rid of Nafta once and for all.” independent.co.uk
Bison recently introduced into Banff's backcountry are settling into their new homes by welcoming new offspring to the herd. Parks Canada says it's the first time wild bison calves have been born in Banff's backcountry in 140 years.

The first calf was born on Earth Day last weekend, and two more tiny bison have joined the herd since. Parks Canada expects seven more calves to follow soon.

"It's fantastic. We knew it was coming, but when the message came out of the backcountry on Saturday that the first calf had already dropped, I think everyone was pleasantly surprised," said Bill Hunt, a resource conservation manager with Parks Canada. 

Known as red coats, the baby bison are currently sticking close to their mothers — who can be quite assertive, Hunt said. The calves are expected to become more playful in the near future, but are currently enjoying the fresh snowfall in the Banff area cbc.ca
The Trump administration is taking retaliatory action against Canada over a trade dispute, moving to impose a 20% tariff on softwood lumber that is typically used to build single-family homes.

In an interview Monday, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said the tariff will be applied retroactively and imposed on Canadian exports to the U.S. of about $5 billion a year. He said the dispute centers on Canadian provinces that have been allegedly allowing loggers to cut down trees at reduced rates and sell them at low prices.

The determination that Canada improperly subsidizes its exports is preliminary, and the Commerce Department will need to make a final decision. In addition, the U.S. International Trade Commission will need to find that the U.S. industry has suffered injury.

But even a preliminary decision has immediate real-world consequences, by discouraging importers from buying lumber from Canada.

“We tried to negotiate a settlement but we were unable,” Ross said, adding that previous administrations have also been unsuccessful in resolving the dispute. wsj.com
When Jean-Philippe Michel, a Toronto-based career coach, works with secondary school students, he doesn’t use the word profession. Neither does he focus on helping his young clients figure out what they want to be when they grow up—at least not directly. For him, there's really no such thing as deciding on a profession to grow up into.

Rather than encouraging each person to choose a profession, say, architect or engineer, he works backwards from the skills that each student wants to acquire. So instead of saying, “I want to be a doctor”, he’ll aim to get students to talk about a goal, in this case “using empathy in a medical setting”.

It might seem a bit esoteric, but the twist in language helps boil down real objectives. And sometimes those don’t jibe with a single profession or even the career choice you might have imagined wanting at the start. Instead, Michel says deciding the skills you want to use leads to a career that’s more targeted—and thus more likely to bring you satisfaction.

It also might be less a job and more a set of projects and work situations that lead you from one thing to the next. The purpose, above all, is to prepare the next generation for a career in the future, which for many will be made up of numerous micro-jobs aimed at well-paid skilled workers, and not a single boss and company, he says. bbc.com
For the second time this week, U.S. President Donald Trump has given Canada a verbal lashing over what he says are unfair trade practices that are putting Americans out of work. 

Trump made his, apparently unplanned, remarks from the Oval Office before signing a presidential memorandum directing his Department of Commerce to investigate the national security implications of importing foreign-made steel. 

"I wasn't going to do this," Trump said. "I was in Wisconsin the other day, and I want to end and add by saying that Canada what they've done to our dairy farm workers is a disgrace. It's a disgrace." cbc.ca